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Dishoom Edinburgh

BOMBAY, MARCH 1923. Botanist, ecologist, and all-round man of the people Patrick Geddes reclines on a long-armed rattan chair. An unruly mop of hair sits atop his wide forehead, which is etched with many lines. We find him in the J.N. Petit reading room, in that second of clean consciousness that comes with waking. The muffled din of the street and the gentle whir of ceiling fans fill the quiet room.

He blinks as he remembers his surroundings. He observes the marble-topped tables lined with visitors as varied as the dusty books housed there: students, curious readers, elderly men poring over periodicals in English, Marathi, Hindi and Gujarati, while a handful of others are quietly nodding off. Everyday people all sitting, working and sleeping, cheek by jowl.

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    Reservations

    Groups of any size may book during the day. After 6pm, only groups of 6 or more may book. Walk-ins always welcome.

    BOMBAY, MARCH 1923. Botanist, ecologist, and all-round man of the people Patrick Geddes reclines on a long-armed rattan chair. An unruly mop of hair sits atop his wide forehead, which is etched with many lines. We find him in the J.N. Petit reading room, in that second of clean consciousness that comes with waking. The muffled din of the street and the gentle whir of ceiling fans fill the quiet room.

    He observes the marble-topped tables lined with many varied visitors: students, curious readers, elderly men poring over periodicals in English, Marathi, Hindi and Gujarati, while a handful of others are quietly nodding off. Everyday people all sitting, working and sleeping, cheek by jowl.

    And amongst them sits Geddes, a big-hearted Scot of excitable character. Bombay has been his home since 1917 when he travelled to India at the behest of Lord Pentland, Governor of Madras. A pioneer of town planning (successful and prolific in equal measure), he brought plenteous wisdom to India from his years reforming Edinburgh’s Old Town.

    His early days in Bombay were spent humbly, wandering the streets. “By living we learn”, he would say to his students from the University of Bombay. And so he would walk, observe, ask, listen – a cheerful nomadic flâneur buoyed by curiosity.

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Food & Drink at Dishoom Edinburgh

BEGIN YOUR DAY AT DISHOOM with breakfast, which might be a Bacon Naan Roll, a Kejriwal or a Big Bombay. Then lunch lightly on Roomali Rolls and Salad Plates, or linger with a feast. Refresh your afternoon with a drop of Chai and a small plate or two. Dine early or dine late. Or just join us for a tipple - perhaps an East India Gimlet, a Viceroy’s Old Fashioned, or our very good Dishoom IPA?

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Menu

Bombay breakfast, lunch, afternoon chai, dinner and late tipples.

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Sir Patrick Geddes

Sir Patrick Geddes

Patrick Geddes (1854-1932) was a Scottish botanist, sociologist, town planner, and all-round man of the people. His work improving living conditions in Edinburgh’s Old Town led him to Bombay in 1915, where he founded the department of Sociology & Civics at Bombay University. This restaurant, its design and the art on the walls are an homage to Geddes and his time in Bombay. With thanks to the National Library of Scotland and the Patrick Geddes Memorial Trust for their kind help.

PICTURED: The big-hearted Scot, Sir Patrick Geddes

Contact Details

3a St Andrew Square
Edinburgh
EH2 2BD

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Tel: 0131 2026 406

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Opening Times

Monday – Thursday
8am to 11pm
Friday
8am to midnight
Saturday
9am to midnight
Sunday
9am to 11pm
Christmas and New Year's opening-closing
We will be closed Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year's Day and January 2nd.