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Dishoom King's Cross
Dishoom Kings Cross

ONE JANUARY MORNING in 1928, a young Irani – not long arrived in Bombay – was waiting to collect a parcel at Victoria Terminus. Unusually, the train was running late. The Irani waited, patiently; then, growing hot and bored, he decided to stretch his legs. He wandered amongst the station crowds and then down a side track, off the main terminus.

Quickly, he found himself in a vast, airy shed filled with the hubbub of a thousand industries crossing paths: freight trains pulling in with a squeal, wagons being loaded and unloaded, men and machines labouring with their cargo. Railway workers shouted to one another in a dozen languages: Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Bihari. Goods of every conceivable sort ebbed and flowed through the station, a veritable artery linking the Indian subcontinent to the Western world via the trading port of Bombay.

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    Groups of any size may book during the day. After 6pm, only groups of 6 or more may book. Walk-ins always welcome.

    ONE JANUARY MORNING in 1928, a young Irani – not long arrived in Bombay – was waiting to collect a parcel at Victoria Terminus. Unusually, the train was running late. Growing hot and bored, the Irani decided to stretch his legs. He wandered amongst the station crowds and then down a side track, off the main terminus.

    Quickly, he found himself in a vast shed filled with the hubbub of a thousand industries: freight trains pulling in with a squeal, wagons being loaded and unloaded, men and machines labouring with their cargo. Goods of every conceivable sort ebbed and flowed through the station, a veritable artery linking the Indian subcontinent to the Western world via the port of Bombay.

    The Irani was of an astute business mind. He had come to Bombay with almost nothing, and he was always seeking an opportunity to strengthen his toehold there. That day, watching the men at work, he felt a keen sense of opportunity.

    The very next morning, he began selling his Irani chai and a few baked goods from an impromptu stall in a corner of the godown. The news spread, passed on from worker to worker, supervisor to babu, and the little stall flourished. The Irani introduced additional items here and there: a rickety table, some chairs, a shelf displaying plump fresh pau, a wooden bench to sit on. It wasn’t luxury, but all who spent a moment there were glad of it.

    Although at first wary of being ousted from his borrowed corner, he soon became bolder: the station guards were grateful for a ready source of chai, and would happily take their baksheesh in spicy keema. The Irani ‘café’ inched outwards appropriating its own space in the large transit shed, buoyed by the burgeoning number of loyal patrons. In almost unnoticeable little steps, it gradually started dominating the godown.

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Food & Drink at Dishoom King's Cross

BEGIN YOUR DAY AT DISHOOM with breakfast, which might be a Bacon Naan Roll, a Kejriwal or a Big Bombay. Then lunch lightly on Roomali Rolls and Salad Plates, or linger with a feast. Refresh your afternoon with a drop of Chai and a small plate or two. Dine early or dine late. Or just join us for a tipple - perhaps an East India Gimlet, a Viceroy’s Old Fashioned, or our very good Dishoom IPA?

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Menus

Bombay breakfast, lunch, afternoon chai, dinner and late tipples.

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The Godown at King's Cross

London in the 1850s

The Godown at King's Cross

Dishoom King's Cross is located within a restored Victorian industrial building — a former railway transit shed, built in 1850. To Londoners this is a warehouse, but to Bombayites, it would be a Godown. Vast quantities of goods once flowed through this foremost interchange between rail, road and canal. Goods were unloaded onto the platform, and the draft horses that worked the canals and turntables were stabled beneath. For over 100 years this building passed goods to and fro between Britain and the rest of the world, and between London and Bombay. 

PICTURED: King’s Cross was London’s foremost interchange between rail, road and canal.

Contact Details

5 Stable Street,
London
N1C 4AB

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Tel: 020 7420 9321

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Opening Times

Monday – Wednesday
8am to 11pm
Thursday – Friday
8am to midnight
Saturday
9am to midnight
Sunday
9am to 11pm
Bank Holidays
Open as usual (except at Christmas time)