Republic Day

It is one of India’s three major national holidays and has much resonance.

It marks the passing into law on 26th January 1950 of India’s constitution, and marks the date when India became a proper sovereign state. It is effectively modern India’s birthday. The date itself was chosen in honour of the generation who fought for freedom – ever since 1930 the Indian National Congress had celebrated 26th January, often in secrecy and always at great risk to themselves, as the date of Swaraj (our word for self-rule and independence). It’s a date that has a huge resonance.

It affirms the dream of independence, celebrates the diversity and vibrancy of India; and offers an opportunity for all Indians and for the world to get a glimpse of the real India. Its importance lies in its recognition that the great experiment, the great gamble of trying to stitch together a functioning, if messy and chaotic, democracy out of a multitude of contradictions requires dedication to an idea of India that is proud, secular and rooted in the values of Gandhi, Nehru, and Ambedkar, who drafted the constitution. Indians celebrate it and are humbled by the memory of those who fought for our freedom and who continue to sacrifice themselves in that hard won freedom’s defence.

Indians outside India, particularly those who may be a couple of generations removed, have an interesting relationship with India. India can be about sentiments and emotions, affirmed and celebrated through the heritage of religion and culture. It is mostly religious festivals that are celebrated, rather than the achievements of India as a nation-state. These achievements – among them, the very survival of India – are massive and important.

In a way, Dishoom is an exercise in going beyond just the religious and cultural rituals, the stereotypical images of India that we all may be familiar with. We’re celebrating the vibrancy and richness of everyday India, an urban India, that may be crazy and chaotic and for some a fight for survival, but is ultimately a celebration of the vivaciousness of India – its enormous irrepressible spirit.

Republic Day is a great day – and it should not be just about the flag raising ceremonies that take place in the Indian High Commissions and embassies around the world. It should be an inspiring day, a day to reflect on India’s achievement over the last half-century. Long may it continue.

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Diwali at Dishoom is back!

This year, on Thursday 20th October, we will celebrate the festival of light at Studio Spaces in Wapping. A night-time affair filled with poetry, live music and bespoke dance performances curated in partnership with our good friend Sweety Kapoor.

The Dishoom Canary Wharf story – Chapter one

Tuesday 12th April – 1973, BOMBAY. It is almost light outside. It must be about six. He’s been awake half the night trying to figure out what to do. Lying on his bed, he stares through the rotating blades of the ceiling fan which only serve to stir the close warm air of his room. He needs to think – he’s running out of time. But his eyes feel salted and his head throbs.

Soumik Datta: The Dishoom Interview

In August, we held a series of events to commemorate 75 Years of Indian Independence and the creation of Pakistan. Before the events took place, we were delighted to sit down with Soumik, a super-talented musician, composer and sarod player, who composed the musical score to accompany the 75 Years series. It was a real pleasure to discuss music, identity and inclusivity, amongst many other topics. We invite you to read on to learn more about how he created such a joyous atmosphere at our events.

An all-new café, coming soon

With greatest delight, we are beyond excited to share that this November we’ll be opening the doors to the brand-new, most fine and gorgeous Dishoom Canary Wharf! Our newest home, nestled in a little corner of Wood Wharf, will bring to life the glittering-shimmering, big-business, metropolitan scene of ‘70s Bombay. When fortunes were made and lost, swindles plotted and uncovered, and dreams were dreamed and broken.