Republic Day

It is one of India’s three major national holidays and has much resonance.

It marks the passing into law on 26th January 1950 of India’s constitution, and marks the date when India became a proper sovereign state. It is effectively modern India’s birthday. The date itself was chosen in honour of the generation who fought for freedom – ever since 1930 the Indian National Congress had celebrated 26th January, often in secrecy and always at great risk to themselves, as the date of Swaraj (our word for self-rule and independence). It’s a date that has a huge resonance.

It affirms the dream of independence, celebrates the diversity and vibrancy of India; and offers an opportunity for all Indians and for the world to get a glimpse of the real India. Its importance lies in its recognition that the great experiment, the great gamble of trying to stitch together a functioning, if messy and chaotic, democracy out of a multitude of contradictions requires dedication to an idea of India that is proud, secular and rooted in the values of Gandhi, Nehru, and Ambedkar, who drafted the constitution. Indians celebrate it and are humbled by the memory of those who fought for our freedom and who continue to sacrifice themselves in that hard won freedom’s defence.

Indians outside India, particularly those who may be a couple of generations removed, have an interesting relationship with India. India can be about sentiments and emotions, affirmed and celebrated through the heritage of religion and culture. It is mostly religious festivals that are celebrated, rather than the achievements of India as a nation-state. These achievements – among them, the very survival of India – are massive and important.

In a way, Dishoom is an exercise in going beyond just the religious and cultural rituals, the stereotypical images of India that we all may be familiar with. We’re celebrating the vibrancy and richness of everyday India, an urban India, that may be crazy and chaotic and for some a fight for survival, but is ultimately a celebration of the vivaciousness of India – its enormous irrepressible spirit.

Republic Day is a great day – and it should not be just about the flag raising ceremonies that take place in the Indian High Commissions and embassies around the world. It should be an inspiring day, a day to reflect on India’s achievement over the last half-century. Long may it continue.

Read the café stories

Suggested Reading

See the journal

Delight in fulsome feasts and thoughtful gifts for loved ones

Whether you show fondness with acts of service or with suitably thoughtful gifts, the Dishoom Store is brimful of curiosities sure to impress loved ones this Valentine’s day. Do read on for our handy gift guide below and find an ample array of gifts from make-at-home café classics to calming home fragrance. The Home Feast will soon be making its departure from the Dishoom store, (so while you still can) delight in generous servings of our most-loved dishes, to be cooked at home.

A Little Magic

“Who wants to see some magic?” Chef Arun calls out. He flings the rolled out dough into the air, sending it soaring above the counter. It spins and twists, a graceful dancer in the air. The children watch its arc, their eyes wide with wonder, until it lands gently back in the chef's hands. The children shriek in delight.

The Dishoom Canary Wharf story – Chapter Three

The phone keeps ringing shrilly through the flat. Nauzer holds his head in his hands, palms clamped over his ears. “Beta, the phone!” He forgot his mother would still be here. He can’t have her answering in case it is Devia. He runs into the corridor to pick it up. It stops just before he can reach it. Breathless, he looks up and sees his mother in the kitchen. 

Dishoom Canary Wharf – now officially OPEN!

Tucked away in a lovely corner of Wood Wharf, Dishoom Canary Wharf is now officially open and ready to welcome you all. The marble-top bar is ready to hold your drink, the textured, patterned (and extremely comforting) chairs are waiting to be kept warm and the hand-painted mural and carefully curated art – from Bombay and beyond – are waiting to be part of your conversations.