Dishoom Uttapam Stack Recipe

Uttapam are a fluffy savoury dosa, made with rice. They're usually enjoyed with savoury toppings but we particularly like ours with lashings of jaggery syrup and a thick, strained yoghurt. Chef Naved has shared his recipe for making an extra fluffy stack at home.

SERVES 2 GENEROUSLY
Uttapam Batter

Ingredients

185g raw basmati rice

60g flattened rice, or cooked, cooled rice

½ tsp fenugreek seeds (not leaves) – optional

60ml coconut milk

20ml cold water

1 level tsp fast action yeast

2 tsp caster sugar

50ml lukewarm water

½ tsp bicarbonate of soda

¼ tsp fine salt

A little vegetable oil, for frying

Fresh fruit, such as blueberries, raspberries or strawberries

Method

  1. Wash and drain the basmati rice. Add the fenugreek seeds (if using), cover generously with fresh water and soak for 5 hours or overnight.
  2. After soaking, drain the rice. Combine with the flattened rice, or cooked, cooled rice, coconut milk and 20ml water and blend to a very thick, smooth batter (add a little more water if it’s too stiff).
  3. To activate the yeast, add it to a small bowl or mug along with the caster sugar and lukewarm water. Stir gently then allow to rest for 5 minutes.
  4. Tip the yeast and water into the blended batter, mix well and rest it in a warm place for 2-3 hours. Go make your jaggery syrup and shrikhand.
  5. Just before frying, add bicarbonate of soda and salt. The batter should be thick to make fluffy pancakes, however if it is too stiff, add a little water. Place a plate into the oven on a low heat, to keep your pancakes warm while you fry in batches.
  6. Warm 1-2tsp oil in a medium-hot pan. Add a ladle of batter per pancake, and fry for 2 minutes either side until lightly browned, fluffy and speckled with bubbles. Place onto your warmed plate whilst you cook the rest.
  7. Serve your stack of pancakes topped with a scoop of creamy Shrikhand, a generous drizzle of jaggery syrup and fresh fruit.
For the toppings
Jaggery Syrup

Ingredients

100g jaggery 

200ml boiling water

20g salted butter

1 small cinnamon stick

Star anise – just two points of a star

Method

  1. Break up the jaggery (a few powerful thumps with a rolling pin will do nicely). Add to a small saucepan with the water, cinnamon and star anise, bring to the boil and reduce to a honey-like consistency.
  2. Add the butter and stir well together. Remove the cinnamon and star anise, and set syrup to one side until needed. 
Shrikhand

Ingredients

250g strained or extra-thick Greek yoghurt

2 tsp icing sugar

A small pinch of fine salt

A pinch of cardamom powder

Method

If you don’t have strained or extra-thick yoghurt, hang 300g Greek yoghurt in muslin overnight in the fridge, above a bowl to catch the drips. Mix all of the ingredients together. Keeps for 1-2 days, refrigerate until needed.

For other Dishoom recipes, please see Dishoom: from Bombay with love, our cookery book and highly subjective guide to Bombay.

Visit the Dishoom Store
Read the café stories

Suggested Reading

See the journal

The Dishoom Battersea Story

With each new café that we open, we write a story deeply rooted in Bombay history or culture. This story, known to us as the founding myth, informs all aspects of the restaurant’s design. We spend months researching the Bombay of the period and combing the city for the right furniture, both vintage and new. In a way, you walk across our thresholds into our stories.

Christmas in our cafés has arrived

Bedecked in their annual finery of baubles, tinsel and lights, our cafés are ready to receive you for your Christmas celebration. So too are our chefs, who have assembled a most excellent array of festive fare for your table.

We humbly invite you to the soft launch of our newest café

Our soft launch will run from 27th November to 2.30pm on 5th December. And to express our gratitude for being among our first guests, all food can be enjoyed at 50% off across breakfast, lunch and dinner – yes, really.

Our cherished chai

Stop by any Bombay tapri (street stall), café, or home, and you will likely find yourself with a gently steaming glass of chai in hand. Before the invention of chai, Bombayites drank kadha, an ayurvedic remedy for coughs and colds made of boiled water and spices like cardamom, cloves and nutmeg. Eventually locals started adding tea leaves, milk, honey and sugar to their ‘kadha’. Chai was born.